I remember attending a metal detecting rally in the early days and something quite unusual happened – I won a raffle prize. There wasn’t much left and I chose a power magnet.

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001_533Once upon a time (about 2004-5) when I was a member of the Administration on a metal detecting site, I dug up a bent hammered coin. There was a member on there at the time called Clive Hallam (aka Mr. Mole) who offered to fix it for me. I duly sent it away and the coin was returned as good as new. Clive went on to write the little essay below and it is worth reproducing here.

I don’t know what has happened to him, but I’m sure he won’t mind if I spread his knowledge just a little further. I didn’t take a picture at the time and after looking at all my coins, I cannot detect the one that was straightened. Continue Reading…

I prefaced my last blog as suggestions for newcomers to the hobby partly because I didn’t want experienced detectorists to think that I was talking down to them. It has happened before. So this time, encouraged by a positive response, I am going to talk about something more mundane and, dare I suggest, of use to beginners and experienced detectorists alike.

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© Mrs. John

This post – a few suggestions for doing basic post-research on your finds – is mainly designed for newcomers to the hobby. When you start making interesting looking finds you naturally want to know more about them. What is the object you’ve found? How and when was it used. etcetera?

For many detectorists, carrying out simple research can be as interesting and exciting as unearthing the object in the first place.

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© silver shilling

My last blog post on artefacts related to freemasonry and found by detectorists elicited a great response from members of the British Metal Detecting forum, one of which was particularly interesting.

I don’t know the size or have a view of the other side, so can’t say what it might be. Perhaps a button or pendant? From the rather small and blurred picture I detect a small forget-me-not flower nestling between the square and compasses. This itemfound by silver shilling has a very interesting history.

 

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SCIn 2012 I made a blogpost about artefacts lost by freemasons. I am pleased to say that I have been able to retrieve that lost post and also make some additions.

Detectorists up and down the country are making discoveries that can be associated with freemasonry in one way or another – from the humble finds to the esoteric – whose meaning are known only to the initiated. Undaunted, these searchers continue to search for their own ‘Holy Grail,’ whatever that may be.

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Finding the Fakenham Hoard Luke Davies, one of four finders of this significant hoard describes a ‘detectorist’s dream of a day’ and Chris Rudd explains why the Iceni hoard of staters is of unique importance.

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DRESS SENSE: When this was first written the nearest the general public ever got to a genuine archaeologist is seeing them on the popular television programme, Time Team. Tony Robinson [now Sir] doesn’t count because he’s a television presenter (and comedian?) He once famously said that you could tell an archaeologist by his poor dress sense and terrible haircuts.

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