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Tenge Symbol

One of my mate Dave’s favourite sayings is that ‘every day’s an adventure’, and it’s especially true as you grow older. Maybe it’s a cliche, but I’m always learning something new. Perhaps I need to compose a listicle for my readers – 10 Ways For Learning Something New Every Day! Except that I don’t wish to bore you with the details. Suffice to say that this old fart has come to realise how important knowledge really is … although I worry sometimes that my brain is eventually going to explode because it’s slowly filling to capacity.

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I once read a study by a British university that showed a good percentage of people who carried good luck charms felt that their fortunes had definitely improved. A claim that warrants further investigation … especially by detectorists.

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TroveA post on the AMDRH forum by a detectorist called ‘Goodbeard’ alerted me to a digitised newspaper by TROVE, produced by the National Library of Australia; and what a wonderful Australian resource it is. TROVE is many things and its growing repository of full text images from books, maps, music, historic newspapers and more!

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Box Blog 5

17 August 2015 — 6 Comments

On the 26th June I posted a blog about a box and its forgotten repository of detecting finds. John Brassey, author, aesthete, gourmet, blogger, detectorist and Framlingham’s answer to Samuel Pepys, made a comment at the time. He forecast, “There’s enough material in that box for three or four blogs.” And he was almost right; this will be number five.

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The recentpermission-granted-logo1 spate of stories where people entering the hobby having bought a relatively simple machine, exploring near a path or in woods and finding ‘treasure’ is on the increase.

In most cases to which I refer, the ‘newbie’ didn’t have the necessary permission to search. In mitigation, they said they were unaware that it was even necessary. As well as being against the law, the practice can also be rather dangerous.

Earlier this year I read that a man using a detector received for Christmas had unearthed a World War II bomb. He commented that it was really the first time he had used the machine and although the bomb was a ‘nice’ find, he would have preferred a big pot of gold. The guy was detecting on a path in a nature reserve!

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finishedBefore the zipper was invented, the buckle was perhaps one of the chief methods of securing two ends together. This ‘wrinkly’ now prefers Velcro. Buckles come in various shapes and sizes depending on the intended use and fashion of the time. Most detectorists will have a selection, but not always knowing much about them. There is a solution for those wanting to do a little research.

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Hand

© JW

Regular readers will know that I love coins on the palm of the hand pictures, simply because I can hone up on my fortune telling abilities. The hand is always in focus and the lines often pin-sharp.

With this in mind, I have been looking closely at the listicles that regularly frequent newspapers, magazines and the Web. For those who don’t know, the word is made up of ‘list’ and ‘article’. Followers of Lewis Carroll will recognise the form as a ‘portmanteau’ word. The Oxford Dictionary defines the word as ‘an article that takes the form of a numbered or bullet-pointed list.’ Listicles are everywhere, and you’ll be familiar with the genre.

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