My apologies that this has taken so long. I’ve been rooting through the box of discarded finds and want to discuss only one particular item this time. Previous posts on this theme, Detecting Days’ Discoveries and Open the Box … Including Sweetheart Jewellery, can be seen by clicking on the links.

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WAGON-WHEEL-WOODENOh no, not again I hear you cry. Some of what appeared in a blog post of 2011, but will be new for many. And anyway, I want Boulton and his contribution to coinage to have a place in my collection of blog posts … and in my own style. I’m not out to re-invent the wheel. Mr Google provides comprehensive information for those who wish to check. Let me Google that for you. Just click HERE and HERE.

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Untitled 4The first paragraph or so is an important part of any story. The beginning is where the reader decides whether to keep reading. A weak first line and they might pass your story by. If you send your epic tale to a detecting magazine (for example), then it’s the editor’s attention that you are trying to attract.

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John Steele extra 421 KB copy 2

© JS – Click to Enlarge

Some of the finds from a high-status Roman burial discovered by John Steele, an American detectorist, are presently on temporary display at Aylesbury County Museum. The rare find has been well documented by Oxford Archaeology. I went along to a presentation at the Museum earlier in the year and what follows is my account …

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Ray Meager

Mrs John enjoys watching Home and Away, an ‘Australian soap chronicling the lives, loves, happiness and heartbreaks of the residents of Summer Bay, a small coastal town in New South Wales, Australia’.

The sun is always shining, the locations idyllic and the cast seems to consist mainly of hunks and hotties. When forced to watch, I take little notice of the sun, sea and scandal, but I do notice one member of the cast; I refer to the old guy as ‘Digger’! He seems to be in most Aussie productions; the archetypal Australian, Ray Meager.

 

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Later on in this blog I discuss Alexander Graham Bell and his detecting exploits. You may have seen something similar in a previous post made in 2011 and subsequently lost. Newcomers to the hobby may not be familiar with the tale; apologies to those who have heard it all before. But first I start with the MacPuffin dollar, a story from Baddeck, Nova Scotia, when Mrs John and I visited for the first time in 2002.

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NGFToday I highlight another metal detecting find that was displayed until recently in Aylesbury Museum, and which has just been removed to make space for a new discovery by a detectorist. Although deemed ‘very significant’ it doesn’t look much, but was voted the winner in the ‘Best Group’ category in 2010 Nations’ Greatest Find Competition organised by The Searcher magazine.

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