Archives For November 2014

The Searcher – January 2015

27th November 2014 — 5 Comments
Cover Jan 2015

January 2015 Cover – © Rodger Shearer

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UK Detectorists find so many personal items like buckles, buttons and clothes fasteners in fields because in past times they were literally spread on the land along with human waste. There wasn’t a sewerage system or refuse collection as we know it today.

Loo2

The little room – © JW

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Mary copy

Queen Mary I Groat – Issue date 1553 -1554 – © JW

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The Roman Gold Ring

15th November 2014 — 13 Comments

Rob Williams and his partner Tina live in Cumbria with their three teenage children and have been using detectors for about 20 years, but only in a casual way and then only using very simple machines. That is, until now! This year they upgraded, found success – and detecting is now their main outdoor pursuit.

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The mention on a detecting forum about the wisdom of purchasing coins on eBay reminded me of an earlier post that I reproduce here. Apologies if you’ve seen it before, but it will be ‘fresh’ for some of my readers. What is it you have to be cautious about? Read on …

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In Britain today policemen are sometimes referred to as ‘Bobbies’. Originally though, they were also referred to as ‘Peelers’, both names in reference to former Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel who created the modern police force.

If you had asked me last week about ‘Peelers’ I would have regurgitated a half-forgotten history lesson circa 1947 and related the story above. If you had asked me yesterday I might have referred you to the orange fruit Mrs. John bought at the supermarket; they were called ‘easy peelers’. Not tangerines or satsumas, but ‘easy peelers’.

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I’ve just spent a frantic half hour looking for all the copper pre-decimal UK pennies that I’d ever found. Why? A throwaway comment on an American detecting forum from a guy living in New Mexico was the catalyst for my search.

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Never did I think that as the son of a coal miner growing up in a County Durham pit village in the 40s and 50s, the experience and local knowledge gained would help a fellow detectorist over 60 years later. A cousin currently living in the same village contacted me and mentioned that he was finding an unusual number of Victorian and the later Georgian coins in one particular area, and asked if I could I explain why this was the case. The answer was easy …

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