Archives For June 2019

Something quite unusual is happening in the UK at the moment. We’re basking – in my case melting – in the heat. But I’m not complaining. What are the other problems? I’ve read that detectorists should be aware of cows, wild boar, adders, and deer when searching … but not much about the little critters … the insects!

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Nettie shows some of her finds at a Minelab Day . . .

I really don’t know where this post is going to lead, but I have a rough idea. The catalyst was Golden Girl, Nettie Edmundson. I’ve written about her in the past, but only about her greatest golden finds. See a teaser HERE written for one of my follow-up articles in The Searcher magazine. Sometime soon I will reprise that story in one of my future blogposts.

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The Middleham Jewel

Every detectorist at one time or another in his or her searching career will become aware of the medieval pendant unearthed in 1985 by Ted Seaton, accompanied by two mates. At first Ted thought that he’d found an old powder compact – until he got it home.

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If the archaeologists can have Indiana Jones, then we deserve our very own hero. There have been several contenders. A rumour on FaceAche revealed that a new hobby magazine called The Treasure Searcher, published by that dynamic duo Paul Barford and Nigel Swift, was about to make an entrance. I understand that their new publication would include the derring-do’s of all ‘naughty’ detectorists. Would a hero emerge? Would anybody buy it? Would their collaborative organ stand up to scrutiny?

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. . . guaranteed to annoy someone, but it’s what I think; you may even be able to recognise yourself 🙂

for many metal detectorists the act of buying a new machine far outweighs the thrill of actually doing the hobby

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A Button Apology

6th June 2019 — 10 Comments

BEDFORD BUTTON

Picture Courtesy of Joe Tilt

‘Just a button’ is how Joe Tilt described one of his recent finds when writing on a detecting forum. In a way he was apologising to the members for ‘only’ finding a button. There was no need. His find was much more interesting than a hammered coin or Roman brooch where information is sparse or non-existent. The humble button spoke volumes and told us a lot about our recent social history.

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